Now that the kids are back in school and you’ve made your trip to Home Depot while chanting “it’s the most wonderful time of the year” it’s time to consider a few things. 

How are the kids managing with their text books?

Recent studies have shown, the average backpacks are being loaded with 18.5lbs of books. This in fact may be too heavy for most teen and pre-teens.  The rule of thumb is that a backpack load should be 15% of the child’s body weight. If your child weigh’s 100lbs, the bag should carry 15lbs of books. In order to keep within this margin, it’s recommended that kids be more selective in what they choose to put in their backpacks and to bring home only what is necessary.

How can you minimize the load on the body and prevent injury?

For good backpack safety, always load the heaviest books closest to the body and the lighter books further away.  Be sure to adjust the straps so that the bag is carried high and tight and always be sure to use both shoulder straps.  Encourage your child not to sling the bag over one shoulder no matter how cool they think it looks.

 

 

What are the three common signs to indicate that your child is not managing their backpacks appropriately??

Are they leaning forward when they are walking with the backpack on?

This is a common sign that the bag is too heavy and in order to compensate for fear of being pulled backwards, the student will lean forward to try to balance.  However, this is going to cause excessive pressure to the cervical and lumbar vertebrae.

 

 

Are they struggling to put the bag on and taking it off?

This might be an indication that the straps are too narrow or not sufficiently padded.  This can be potentially harmful and studies have shown that heavy forces compressing into the shoulder can put pressure on the nerves that can cause sensory disturbances and in some cases even atrophy. 

Is the child complaining of any back pain?

This is a typical warning sign that the body puts out as an attempt to indicate that the stresses on the body are not balanced and therefore the asymmetry will cause muscle pain and lactic acid to form in the larger muscle groups.  If any of these symptoms are continually noted, it may be time to purchase a new bag.

 

Now that the kids are back in school and you’ve made your trip to Home Depot while chanting “it’s the most wonderful time of the year” it’s time to consider a few things. 

How are the kids managing with their text books?

Recent studies have shown, the average backpacks are being loaded with 18.5lbs of books. This in fact may be too heavy for most teen and pre-teens.  The rule of thumb is that a backpack load should be 15% of the child’s body weight. If your child weigh’s 100lbs, the bag should carry 15lbs of books. In order to keep within this margin, it’s recommended that kids be more selective in what they choose to put in their backpacks and to bring home only what is necessary.

How can you minimize the load on the body and prevent injury?

For good backpack safety, always load the heaviest books closest to the body and the lighter books further away.  Be sure to adjust the straps so that the bag is carried high and tight and always be sure to use both shoulder straps.  Encourage your child not to sling the bag over one shoulder no matter how cool they think it looks.

 

 

What are the three common signs to indicate that your child is not managing their backpacks appropriately??

Are they leaning forward when they are walking with the backpack on?

This is a common sign that the bag is too heavy and in order to compensate for fear of being pulled backwards, the student will lean forward to try to balance.  However, this is going to cause excessive pressure to the cervical and lumbar vertebrae.

 

 

Are they struggling to put the bag on and taking it off?

This might be an indication that the straps are too narrow or not sufficiently padded.  This can be potentially harmful and studies have shown that heavy forces compressing into the shoulder can put pressure on the nerves that can cause sensory disturbances and in some cases even atrophy. 

Is the child complaining of any back pain?

This is a typical warning sign that the body puts out as an attempt to indicate that the stresses on the body are not balanced and therefore the asymmetry will cause muscle pain and lactic acid to form in the larger muscle groups.  If any of these symptoms are continually noted, it may be time to purchase a new bag.

 

Now that the kids are back in school and you’ve made your trip to Home Depot while chanting “it’s the most wonderful time of the year” it’s time to consider a few things. 

How are the kids managing with their text books?

Recent studies have shown, the average backpacks are being loaded with 18.5lbs of books. This in fact may be too heavy for most teen and pre-teens.  The rule of thumb is that a backpack load should be 15% of the child’s body weight. If your child weigh’s 100lbs, the bag should carry 15lbs of books. In order to keep within this margin, it’s recommended that kids be more selective in what they choose to put in their backpacks and to bring home only what is necessary.

How can you minimize the load on the body and prevent injury?

For good backpack safety, always load the heaviest books closest to the body and the lighter books further away.  Be sure to adjust the straps so that the bag is carried high and tight and always be sure to use both shoulder straps.  Encourage your child not to sling the bag over one shoulder no matter how cool they think it looks.

 What are the three common signs to indicate that your child is not managing their backpacks appropriately??

Are they leaning forward when they are walking with the backpack on?

This is a common sign that the bag is too heavy and in order to compensate for fear of being pulled backwards, the student will lean forward to try to balance.  However, this is going to cause excessive pressure to the cervical and lumbar vertebrae.

 Are they struggling to put the bag on and taking it off?

This might be an indication that the straps are too narrow or not sufficiently padded.  This can be potentially harmful and studies have shown that heavy forces compressing into the shoulder can put pressure on the nerves that can cause sensory disturbances and in some cases even atrophy. 

Is the child complaining of any back pain?

This is a typical warning sign that the body puts out as an attempt to indicate that the stresses on the body are not balanced and therefore the asymmetry will cause muscle pain and lactic acid to form in the larger muscle groups.  If any of these symptoms are continually noted, it may be time to purchase a new bag.

 

 

 

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