Sleep apnea is becoming a lot more common now.  Defined as pauses or short stops in breathing during sleep, obstructive apnea can pose serious health threats such as increase in blood pressure, heart attacks and even stroke.  It is estimated that 26.8% of the Canadian population either has sleep apnea or is at risk of developing it.  Other symptoms associated with it are daytime fatigue, poor concentration, headaches and increase in anxiety.

So what can we do?  Most of us are familiar with CPAP machines which provide steady airflow pressure. These machines are noisy, must be worn with a mask all night and are often quite uncomfortable. Despite their effectiveness, it has been shown that 60% of the population who have them do not use them.

What else can be done?  Consider the connection between FHP (forward head position) and sleep apnea.  People are at a higher risk than ever in developing advanced stages of FHP.  The physical anterior shift of the head has been shown to limit the airway during sleep.  Advanced stages of FHP have demonstrated over 87% instances of sleep apnea.  Perhaps it’s time to consider a more physically corrective solution in restoring airways.  By correcting FHP, we have more control over the body functions that we depend on working automatically during times of sleep.

Sleep apnea is bearing a lot more common now.  Defined as pauses or short stops in breathing during sleep, obstructive apnea can pose serious health threats such as increase in blood pressure, heart attacks and even stroke.  It is estimated that 26.8% of the Canadian population either has sleep apnea or is at risk of developing it.  Other symptoms associated with it are daytime fatigue, poor concentration, headaches and increase in anxiety.

So what can we do?  Most of us are familiar with CPAP machines which provide steady airflow pressure. These machines are noisy, must be worn with a mask all night and are often quite uncomfortable. Despite their effectiveness, it has been shown that 60% of the population who have them do not use them.

What else can be done?  Consider the connection between FHP (forward head position) and sleep apnea.  People are at a higher risk than ever in developing advanced stages of FHP.  The physical anterior shift of the head has been shown to limit the airway during sleep.  Advanced stages of FHP have demonstrated over 87% instances of sleep apnea.  Perhaps it’s time to consider a more physically corrective solution in restoring airways.  By correcting FHP, we have more control over the body functions that we depend on working automatically during times of sleep.